Driving automobiles

TOP TEN SPEEDING LIST

not quite top ten, but this actually happened…
        I had just finished replacing my radiator and decided that I should try
to make the engine over heat on my way to work… I was doing about 55-60 in
a 25 mph zone, and I was concentrating on my temp gauge and the road…, not
the cop in my rear view mirror, believe it or not, I got out of the ticket,
the cop said "I was too busy concentrating on the road to look at my speedo",
i.e. he was afraid of going that fast!, he let me go! (the radiator workedfine)

How about top ten Cop excuses for not giving a ticket!

      __________
     /          \
    /————\            Edward   sei…@lamar.colostate.edu
   {Oo====o=====oO}
   [[[[[[[[]]]]]]]]   if you squint real hard it kinda looks like my car!
   —          —  85′ Gli w/euro Headlights, bilsteins, low springs etc.  

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posted by admin in Uncategorized and have Comments (12)

12 Responses to “TOP TEN SPEEDING LIST”

  1. admin says:

    In article <1994Mar12.053654.105399@yuma>, sei…@lamar.acns.ColoState.EDU (Edward Seibert) writes…
    >not quite top ten, but this actually happened…
    >    I had just finished replacing my radiator and decided that I should try
    >to make the engine over heat on my way to work… I was doing about 55-60 in
    >a 25 mph zone, and I was concentrating on my temp gauge and the road…, not
    >the cop in my rear view mirror, believe it or not, I got out of the ticket,
    >the cop said "I was too busy concentrating on the road to look at my speedo",
    >i.e. he was afraid of going that fast!, he let me go! (the radiator workedfine)

    >How about top ten Cop excuses for not givi

    I play softball with a guy who is a cop and we got talking about excuses
    people give one day. He told me a story about one day that he pulled over a
    nice looking girl. As he approached the car her jaw dropped and she just
    sort of eexclaimed, "WOW!…What a good looking cop! I’ve never seen a
    policeman who looked so good!"

    I said "What did you do?"

    He said "I let her go."

    I don’t know if he knows he’s not that good looking :)

                                                                 BP

  2. admin says:

    In article <12MAR199414450…@lmsmgr.lerc.nasa.gov> afba…@lmsmgr.lerc.nasa.gov (BARRY PIENDL) writes:

    >I play softball with a guy who is a cop and we got talking about excuses
    >people give one day. He told me a story about one day that he pulled over a
    >nice looking girl. As he approached the car her jaw dropped and she just
    >sort of eexclaimed, "WOW!…What a good looking cop! I’ve never seen a
    >policeman who looked so good!"

    >I said "What did you do?"

    >He said "I let her go."

    >I don’t know if he knows he’s not that good looking :)

    A policeman friend of mine likes to approach cars that he’s stopped for
    speeding from the passenger side.  The driver naturally expects him to
    come on the driver side, so is intently watching the left side mirror.  
    Meanwhile, the cop can watch what "preparations" are being made through
    the passenger window.  The most frequent female response, he says, is
    a readjustment of the bra and neckline.  At that point he taps the window,
    and the disheveled driver figures she’s not getting out of this one.

    Note:  This man is not a pervert looking for a free glimpse of some skin.
    I’m sure you’re all thinking "creep".  He uses this method for safety
    reasons, which are more important than the above mentioned.  Where he works,
    they have a lot of drug traffic, and at times he’s put his life on the line
    while stopping traffic violators.

    BTW, he also has good tips on what REALLY works to get out of a ticket.

    Stephen B. Wright
    sbwri…@midway.uchicago.edu

  3. admin says:

    stephen baker wright (sbwri…@ellis.uchicago.edu) wrote:

    > BTW, he also has good tips on what REALLY works to get out of a ticket.

    So?  Did he tell you what works?  C’mon, we’re all your buddies.  Share.

    Don Montgomery
    do…@sr.hp.com

  4. admin says:

    In article <1994Mar14.014419.10…@midway.uchicago.edu>, sbwri…@ellis.uchicago.edu (stephen baker wright) writes:
    – A policeman friend of mine likes to approach cars that he’s stopped for
    – speeding from the passenger side.  The driver naturally expects him to

    [ ... ]

    - Note:  This man is not a pervert looking for a free glimpse of some skin.
    – I’m sure you’re all thinking "creep".  He uses this method for safety
    – reasons, which are more important than the above mentioned.  Where he works,
    – they have a lot of drug traffic, and at times he’s put his life on the line
    – while stopping traffic violators.

    EVERY cop who does a traffic stop is putting "his life on the line". You
    never know who or what’s inside that car and what their intent is. Any
    variation on the usual "straight up behind the driver" approach is to
    the officers advantage and the suspects disadvantage. Good for your
    friend.


    Dave Ratcliffe                      vogon1!frackit!d…@cse.psu.edu
    Harrisburg, Pa.

  5. admin says:

    In article <1994Mar12.053654.105399@yuma>, sei…@lamar.acns.ColoState.EDU (Edward Seibert) writes:
    > not quite top ten, but this actually happened…
    >    I had just finished replacing my radiator and decided that I should try
    > to make the engine over heat on my way to work… I was doing about 55-60 in
    > a 25 mph zone, and I was concentrating on my temp gauge and the road…, not
    > the cop in my rear view mirror, believe it or not, I got out of the ticket,
    > the cop said "I was too busy concentrating on the road to look at my speedo",
    > i.e. he was afraid of going that fast!, he let me go! (the radiator workedfine)

    > How about top ten Cop excuses for not giving a ticket!

    I was flying via I-70 Westbound 85 mph as usual, proceeded right up to the
    exit ramp to catch I-435 South, when I noticed a Crown Vic giving me his
    party lights.  Had my car pulled over so quick, my car was still on the
    first 1/4 section of the entrance ramp (from 85 mph!)  After he got my
    license, he said, "Mr. Attaway, today is your lucky day.  I’m out of tickets,
    and I don’t want to take you downtown and . . . you pulled over quick, so
    I’m going to let you go.  Slow it down."

    It took me a while to get up to speed.
                                                       o
    -Duane                                         /\o/                   O
                                                  0  \\           |     0-#
     finger datta…@vax1.umkc.edu                   //           |      / \
    ===============================================================================
    If I’m not here, I’m either in class, at the border to fetch a taco, or in bed.

  6. admin says:

    In article <1994Mar12.053654.105399@yuma>, sei…@lamar.acns.ColoState.EDU (Edward Seibert) writes:
    > not quite top ten, but this actually happened…
    >    I had just finished replacing my radiator and decided that I should try
    > to make the engine over heat on my way to work… I was doing about 55-60 in
    > a 25 mph zone, and I was concentrating on my temp gauge and the road…, not
    > the cop in my rear view mirror, believe it or not, I got out of the ticket,
    > the cop said "I was too busy concentrating on the road to look at my speedo",
    > i.e. he was afraid of going that fast!, he let me go! (the radiator workedfine)

    > How about top ten Cop excuses for not giving a ticket!

    I was pulled over on I-787 in Troy, NY back in ’83 when I was going to
    school (Rensselaer Poly Inst).  The cop told me I was going 77 and that
    he had been tailgating me for 3 miles.  I must really have been in the
    twilight zone, because I did not see him back there.  Anyway, I told
    him I was a student at RPI, and he gave me my license back, said, "you
    guys have a good hockey team" and let me go.


    Peter Venetoklis                           pe…@gdstech.grumman.com
    Senior Engineer – Mission Analysis               Grumman Corporation
                     Opinions are mine, not Grumman’s.
          Whoever ends up buying Grumman can’t have them, either.

  7. admin says:

    My best escape was from a ticket for both speeding and blowing through a
    stop sign.  
    I was on in a 45 zone that crosses a bigger street.  I had the only stop
    sign.  I could see about 1/4 mile in each direction.  Immediately after
    passing the stop sign, the road I was on has a great turn, then becomes a
    woodsy, curvy 25 zone.  I love that road.  I didn’t even slow for the stop
    sign.  I threw my SHO around every curve in the woodsy area at the limits of
    adhesion (I know it really well).  About 2 miles from the stop sign I got
    stuck behind slow traffic.  A mile later I saw the cop in my mirror.  Shit.
    The question:  "Do you know why I pulled you over?"  "Um, I was speeding,
    officer?"  "Remember that stop sign 3 miles back there?"  I had to think for
    a second…  Then I remembered it.  He said he had followed me for 3 miles,
    but couldn’t keep up.  Heh heh.  
    Well, I thought I was dead, but before I’d left my house (6 miles back) I
    put about 1/3 quart of oil in the motor.  I had spilled a little.  When he
    stopped me, we both smelled the burning oil, then noticed a little grey
    smoke coming out from around the hood.  I acted totally freaked out and
    scared about it.  We opened the hood and couldn’t find the origin of the
    smoke.  He said:  "Well Chris, it looks like you’ve got enough problems today,
    so I’m not going to give you a ticket."  Yahoo!!
    End of story.
    Chris
    cm0…@uhura.cc.rochester.edu

  8. admin says:

    In article <1994Mar29.173839.13…@gdstech.grumman.com>,

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    Peter Venetoklis <pe…@gdstech.grumman.com> wrote:
    >In article <1994Mar12.053654.105399@yuma>, sei…@lamar.acns.ColoState.EDU (Edward Seibert) writes:
    >> not quite top ten, but this actually happened…
    >>        I had just finished replacing my radiator and decided that I should try
    >> to make the engine over heat on my way to work… I was doing about 55-60 in
    >> a 25 mph zone, and I was concentrating on my temp gauge and the road…, not
    >> the cop in my rear view mirror, believe it or not, I got out of the ticket,
    >> the cop said "I was too busy concentrating on the road to look at my speedo",
    >> i.e. he was afraid of going that fast!, he let me go! (the radiator workedfine)

    >> How about top ten Cop excuses for not giving a ticket!

    >I was pulled over on I-787 in Troy, NY back in ’83 when I was going to
    >school (Rensselaer Poly Inst).  The cop told me I was going 77 and that
    >he had been tailgating me for 3 miles.  I must really have been in the
    >twilight zone, because I did not see him back there.  Anyway, I told
    >him I was a student at RPI, and he gave me my license back, said, "you
    >guys have a good hockey team" and let me go.

    In the spring of 1980 I was heading back from Conn. to MA on the MA
    turnpike. It was about 7:00 am on a Sunday morning and there was
    no one on the road. I was cruising between 100 and 105 in a 68
    Dodge Charger (God I loved that car.) I don’t know where he came from
    but all of a sudden I had a statey on my bumper.

    He took my license and registration. I made no attempt at getting out
    of the ticket. After a few minutes he came back and said he knew the
    roads were empty and he wasn’t going to write me up. When he left he
    asked me try and keep it under 70. My girlfriend and I laughed all
    the way back to MA and that experience bought a lot of respect for
    state cops from me. It proved that they weren’t all jerks.

    - Dave
      87 325is


    David Draper
    ddra…@netcom.com
    (510) 252-0713
    California is not a place, It’s a state of mind.

  9. admin says:

            A few years ago I gotr pulled over on Hwy 6 on my way to College
    Station, Texas.  I was probably exceeding 80 mph as usual.  The DPS
    trooper pulled me over and in a THICK Texas drawl said, "Boy could I
    see your racin’ license please"? (With emphasis placed on racin’) So I
    gave him my SCCA Pro Rally license and National Competition license.
    He replied, "What the HELL is this?" So I told him that he asked for
    my racing license so there they are.  He laughed a little and said
    have a nice day.  He actually let me go.
                                    -Mac.

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

  10. admin says:

    I have two incidents that "now" bring chuckles…  The first was with a 72 Toyota Cylica
    and the mountain road from San Jose, CA to Santa Cruz.  I had just got the car and
    an acquaintance needed a ride "over the hill".  The little Toyota handled curves like
    a slot car so…. On the way up the hill, doing at least 30 over the speed limit, I passed
    a CHP sitting, hidden, on the side of the road.  I knew that he saw me, and I was going
    to just pull over until my passenger said the he was carrying a whole bunch of drugs.
    I figured that if I got to the top of the hill, I could turn into the restuarent area and
    have him get out, so I hit it hard.  When I got to the top of the hill, I immediately turned
    into the parking lot and parked behind a truck.  Within seconds the CHP literaly
    flew over the top, turned his lights and siren on, and sped down the other side.
    I turned back the other way, and took the old road back to Santa Cruz.  That
    CHP must have thought that I was Speed Racer, as he chased down the other side of the
    hill.  I wonder if he ever caught me….

    The other event was comming back from Oregon in a 56 Plymoth Fury with a 413 dual
    quad engine under the hood.  I and a Porsche Targa pulled side by side and the race
    was on for over 30 miles on Highway 5 at about 2 in the morning.  I finally pulled off
    on 505 going to 580 and the Porsche continuing to L.A.  About 5 minutes later,
    traveling about 60 in a 55 area, I was pulled over by a CHP.  He didn’t say a word
    other than asking me for my liscense and registration.  Trying to put a bit of levity
    in the situation, I commented that I had been going faster than the speed limit, but
    that it was really hard to go so slow in my car…  He gave me one of those if looks
    could kill looks, and said "Yeah, and if I could have caught up with you about 30 miles
    back, you would have really gotten a ticket!!!"  He said that he clocked us
    at 120 before he lost us cause he couldn’t keep up.  (of course he couldn’t prove that
    it was me cause all he saw were two blurs going by.)
    60 in a 55 wasn’t too bad considering…

  11. admin says:

    In article <Cnr0tD….@unixhub.SLAC.Stanford.EDU>, m…@merlin.slac.stanford.edu writes:

    |> I turned back the other way, and took the old road back to Santa Cruz.  That
            [cool evasion scenarios snipped]

      My favorite way to avoid a ticket took place on the
    Will Rogers Turnpike in Missouri.
    Passing a convoy of RVs in my Laser Turbo, I put my foot
    down to show those guys "who’s boss".  About 90, and passing
    RVs going 40, so it looked really bad.  Missouri State Trooper
    (or whatever) passes going the other way, turns on his lights
    and pulls into the median after he passes me.  I take a quick right
    on the first exit (lucky it was there).  Barely make the 25mph
    exit ramp with a 90 degree turn and a stop sign at the bottom.
    (in the grass, in fact)  Keep going and take a 15 minute tour
    of very beautiful Ozark mountains.
      Best part was that after getting back on the road and going at a slower
    pace, I caught up with the RVs.  The cop was just cruising behind them,
    clocking oncoming traffic.  I pulled off my sunglasses, looked innocent,
    and passed him, and went on home.
      And Irving, TX police can’t find aren’t the greatest either,
    but that’s another story…

    Scot A. Johnson    ____         V-P RPI Paintball Club
    john…@rpi.edu   0____0        TIP#175

  12. admin says:

    In article <2nq1ge$…@usenet.rpi.edu>, john…@bray1b.its.rpi.edu (Ah’m yer

    Huckleberry) writes:

    Writing about cars for a living, I’m constantly switching from one test vehicle
    to another, and it is very easy to let my speed get away from me when I’ve just
    switched into, say, a Viper, after having driven a Hyundai Sonata for a week.
    (Never mind the fact that I kept the Sonata running at 80 to begin with.)  So I
    have had my share of visits with Officer Joe over the years.

    I usually can talk my way out, perhaps because I’ve known police personally
    over the years and try not to give ‘em lip.  In fact, I have several times
    anticipated getting stopped and pulled over to wait.  They appreciate that
    immediate admission on guilt.  It didn’t work one time, though.  The officer
    seemed ready to give me a break–he was very interested in the car I was
    driving, which wasn’t yet on the market–until my wife blurted out: "He always
    drives fast, officer.  He’s an autowriter and it’s part of his job."

    Three fast tales of success:

    -I felt I’d been written up for too many miles over by a particular nasty cop
    who seemed out to avenge his lousy life.  In court, he got up on the stand,
    stammered and then admitted he hadn’t the slightest recollection of what
    happened that day.  The judge wasn’t particularly pleased but admitted he had
    no evidence and had to let me go.

    -A PA state trooper pulled me over north of Philly on I-95 and decided to give
    me the DI drill, screaming in my face like I was a green recruit at boot camp.
    At the time, I had an old Labrador Retriever, who was snoozing in the back. The
    yelling woke her up and sensing I was under attack, she rushed to my
    rescue–giving the cop the biggest, wettest kiss he’d ever had.  At the moment,
    his mouth was wide open in mid-yell, and that dog Frenched his tonsils.  He
    froze for a moment, with the dog’s snoot in his mouth, jerked away, grabbed my
    license and nearly ran back to his cruiser.  Five minutes later, he used his PA
    to order me over to his car, and without even looking in my direction, thrust
    my license (sans a ticket) out the window and told me to get lost.  

    -At 17, I was driving down to Florida in my beat-up old Ford, $19 left to make
    it to Palm Beach.  I’d just crossed the line into S.Carolina on old US 301 when
    I ran through the old Southern speed trap.  The limit went from 65 to 15 in a
    matter of a block, and Smokey Joe was waiting at the end of it for a Yankee
    sucker like me.  When he saw my long hair and beard, he smiled maliciously, and
    I started hearing the banjo theme from Deliverance.  He wanted $20–on the
    spot.  I tried to hide $4–the price of a tank of gas back then–and give him
    $15.  Instead, he grabbed my wallet, reached inside for the cash, and started
    counting.
    "Where you goin’, boy," he asked, and I stammered out "W-w-w-west Palm Beach."
    "Damn," he responded, scratching his bald head.  "I don’t think you’ll make it
    even if I give you back yo’ money."  Which he decided to do.  As I thanked him
    and slowly drove off, he left me with a stern warning.  "Now don’t you speed no
    mo’.  Them Southern cops, they’ll get ya, you heah?"