Driving automobiles

Re: Outside mirrors: was Panoramic Rear View Mirror

In article <6…@heimdall.sdrc.com> gppe…@cae334.nohost.nodomain
(Peter D. Bennett) writes

>I read somewhere that in order to eliminate your blind spots, you could just
>angle your side rear view mirrors out abot 15 degrees BEYOND where you can
>just see the side of your car.  This way, you see things approaching in your
>center mirror, then they move into your side mirror, and finally into your
>periferal vission.  Seems to work well, although it takes some time to get
>used to.  I try to keep a good inventory of the cars behind and aroundme,
>just to be safe.

>-PDB

  This has worked sell for me for many years.  Especially useful on multi-lane
  roads.  I have mine adjusted so that I can see the front of a car on
  either side with my peripheral vision while still seeing the rear of the
  vehicle in the outside mirror.  Really eliminates blind spots.  Blind spots
  are less of a problem in my wife’s Volvo than in my Supra, though.

John Broughton

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posted by admin in Uncategorized and have Comments (8)

8 Responses to “Re: Outside mirrors: was Panoramic Rear View Mirror”

  1. admin says:

    In article <1993Feb10.134749.26…@cbnewse.cb.att.com> w…@cbnewse.cb.att.com

    (john.l.broughton) writes:

    >In article <6…@heimdall.sdrc.com> gppe…@cae334.nohost.nodomain
    >(Peter D. Bennett) writes

    >>I read somewhere that in order to eliminate your blind spots, you could just
    >>angle your side rear view mirrors out abot 15 degrees BEYOND where you can
    >>just see the side of your car.  This way, you see things approaching in your

    <<<<some lines deleted>>>

    >>-PDB

    >  This has worked sell for me for many years.  Especially useful on multi-lane
    >  roads.  I have mine adjusted so that I can see the front of a car on
    >  either side with my peripheral vision while still seeing the rear of the
    >  vehicle in the outside mirror.  Really eliminates blind spots.  Blind spots

    <<<<line deleted>>>>               —————————–???

    >John Broughton

    Yeah, I use a similar method.  I keep some overlap between the side mirror
    ‘picture’ and that of the rear-view mirror.  Then I make sure the lane is
    clear by turning my head.

    When adjusting our mirrors, let’s keep in mind we need to see motorcycles
    as well as cars.  I am more concerned about hitting one of them than about
    hitting another auto.

    Neal Forss

    Neal Forss   c/o Wind River Systems  1010 Atlantic Av.  Alameda, CA  94501
    telephone: (510) 814-2167                   internet address:  n…@wrs.com

    Don’t even begin to think this is an official Wind River Systems statement.

  2. admin says:

    In article <C28sJ0….@wrs.com>, n…@wrs.com (Neal Forss) writes:
    > Yeah, I use a similar method.  I keep some overlap between the side mirror
    > ‘picture’ and that of the rear-view mirror.  Then I make sure the lane is
    > clear by turning my head.

    There was an article in POPULAR SCIENCE a month or so ago about this.  The
    idea is to have the rear and side mirror viewing areas overlap as little as
    possible.  As stated in the article, most drivers tend to adjust their side
    mirrors so that they can still see the side of the car, causing a large
    overlap.  The best angle is about 15 degrees farther outward.  The suggested
    method for achieving this is to rest your head against the window and adjust
    the mirror until you can barely see the side of the car, for the left
    mirror.  For the right mirror, lean over until your head is even with the
    car’s center line and adjust until you can barely see the side of the car.

    The use of so called "blind spot" mirrors and right hand mirrors that make
    objects look smaller and farther away was deemed highly questionable.
    Convex blind spot mirrors, which are usually much too small, distort images
    to the point that you can’t rely upon what you are seeing; distortion
    increases as distance from the mirror increases.  Right hand mirrors that
    shrink images make it more difficult to judge distances.

    I fully agree.  After reading the article I began driving with my mirrors
    adjusted this way.  Its great!  I feel much safer and much more aware of the
    traffic around me.  As vehicles come up behind me, they don’t begin to show
    up in my side mirror until they have almost left my rear mirror.  And by the
    time they leave the view of my side mirror, I can see them in my peripheral
    vision.  I never completely loose sight of even the smallest cars.  The
    previous poster mentioned a concern over motorcycles; I can’t comment as
    it’s winter where I am and has been since I made the change.  Come spring
    when the bikes start showing up again, I’ll watch to see how well this
    adjustment works for keeping an eye on them.

    Note:  Adjusting your mirrors in this manor is NOT a substitute for turning
    your head and actually looking.  Drivers not looking is what causes most
    accidents.

      Tony D. Lowe, The HapMaster  BITNET:   tdlow…@ulkyvx.bitnet
      University of Louisville     INTERNET: tdlow…@ulkyvx.louisville.edu
           "People without a sense of humor don’t have any sense at all."

  3. admin says:

    n…@wrs.com (Neal Forss) writes:

    …<>…

    >When adjusting our mirrors, let’s keep in mind we need to see motorcycles
    >as well as cars.  I am more concerned about hitting one of them than about
    >hitting another auto.

    I see we share a common interest.
    Thanks for thinking of us.

    >Neal Forss
    >–
    >Neal Forss   c/o Wind River Systems  1010 Atlantic Av.  Alameda, CA  94501
    >telephone: (510) 814-2167                   internet address:  n…@wrs.com
    >Don’t even begin to think this is an official Wind River Systems statement.

    Art "An appreciative biker"
    art…@informix.com

  4. admin says:

    In article <1993Feb11.14200…@ulkyvx.louisville.edu> you write:

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    >In article <C28sJ0….@wrs.com>, n…@wrs.com (Neal Forss) writes:
    >> Yeah, I use a similar method.  I keep some overlap between the side mirror
    >> ‘picture’ and that of the rear-view mirror.  Then I make sure the lane is
    >> clear by turning my head.

    >There was an article in POPULAR SCIENCE a month or so ago about this.  The
    >idea is to have the rear and side mirror viewing areas overlap as little as
    >possible.  As stated in the article, most drivers tend to adjust their side
    >mirrors so that they can still see the side of the car, causing a large
    >overlap.  The best angle is about 15 degrees farther outward.  The suggested
    >method for achieving this is to rest your head against the window and adjust
    >the mirror until you can barely see the side of the car, for the left
    >mirror.  For the right mirror, lean over until your head is even with the
    >car’s center line and adjust until you can barely see the side of the car.

    >The use of so called "blind spot" mirrors and right hand mirrors that make
    >objects look smaller and farther away was deemed highly questionable.
    >Convex blind spot mirrors, which are usually much too small, distort images
    >to the point that you can’t rely upon what you are seeing; distortion
    >increases as distance from the mirror increases.  Right hand mirrors that
    >shrink images make it more difficult to judge distances.

    I found an even easier method about 2 years ago in the local newspapers
    automotive section.  The idea is to set your right and left hand mirrors so
    that when you are in the normal driving position.  You should be able to
    see a vehichle fully transition from the middle review to the appropriate
    side mirror.  In other words, you should see the whole front of the vehicle
    divided into both mirrors until it has moved fully into to the middle or
    one of the side view mirrors.    

    For example, if 3/4 of the visible front of the car is in your rearview mirror,
    then the other 1/4 of the cars visible front should be in the appropriate side
    mirror.

    There, I hope that’s clear enough.  Anyway, I’ve used this technique since I’ve
    read the article and it works great.  By the time the is out of the side mirror
    view (passing) I can turn my head slightly and see it out the window.

    Unfortunately, In my wifes ’85 Sentra, her single side mirror does not adjust
    for this.  

    If anyone knows of good sources for aftermarket electric side mount mirrors, I
    would greatly appreciate the info.

    Thanks,

    Steven


    Steven Johnson (IMD)                        M/S FM2-60
    sjohn…@pcocd2.intel.com                   1900 Prairie City Road
    (916)356-5540                               Folsom, CA 95630

  5. admin says:

    Re: Mirror adjustment angles and blind spots

    >        My daughter bought me a WINK mirror for xmas. One of those jobs
    >that goes all the way across the top of your windshield. Actually it is
    >five mirror built into one mount. It takes a little getting used to,but
    >once your accustomed it, it is great. You can see everything behind you
    >and both sides blind spots without even using your side mirrors.>–

    These WINK mirrors are great!!.  I have owned three cars now with them.  You seem to have one blind spot right behind your head (if your tall like me) but the usual drivers side outside mirror can easily be set to cover it.  The price is also very reasonable ~$20.  Try to get the biggest one that will fit in your car. The only disadvantage is that you may loose your sun visors (just get some good sunglasses).  These mirrors contain alot of glass, but the glare will be less than the mirror that was supplied

     originally.  There is some distortion where the mirrors meet but nothing that would mess up your depth perception.  

    As a plus, they are REALLY good for monitoring police trying to sneak up behind you.  

  6. admin says:

    In article <C2CGJE….@inews.Intel.COM> sjohn…@frx193.intel.com (Steve Johnson – IMD ~) writes:

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    >In article <1993Feb11.14200…@ulkyvx.louisville.edu> you write:
    >>In article <C28sJ0….@wrs.com>, n…@wrs.com (Neal Forss) writes:
    >>> Yeah, I use a similar method.  I keep some overlap between the side mirror
    >>> ‘picture’ and that of the rear-view mirror.  Then I make sure the lane is
    >>> clear by turning my head.

    >>There was an article in POPULAR SCIENCE a month or so ago about this.  The
    >>idea is to have the rear and side mirror viewing areas overlap as little as
    >>possible.  As stated in the article, most drivers tend to adjust their side
    >>mirrors so that they can still see the side of the car, causing a large
    >>overlap.  The best angle is about 15 degrees farther outward.  The suggested
    >>method for achieving this is to rest your head against the window and adjust
    >>the mirror until you can barely see the side of the car, for the left
    >>mirror.  For the right mirror, lean over until your head is even with the
    >>car’s center line and adjust until you can barely see the side of the car.

    >>The use of so called "blind spot" mirrors and right hand mirrors that make
    >>objects look smaller and farther away was deemed highly questionable.
    >>Convex blind spot mirrors, which are usually much too small, distort images
    >>to the point that you can’t rely upon what you are seeing; distortion
    >>increases as distance from the mirror increases.  Right hand mirrors that
    >>shrink images make it more difficult to judge distances.

    >I found an even easier method about 2 years ago in the local newspapers
    >automotive section.  The idea is to set your right and left hand mirrors so
    >that when you are in the normal driving position.  You should be able to
    >see a vehichle fully transition from the middle review to the appropriate
    >side mirror.  In other words, you should see the whole front of the vehicle
    >divided into both mirrors until it has moved fully into to the middle or
    >one of the side view mirrors.    

    >For example, if 3/4 of the visible front of the car is in your rearview mirror,
    >then the other 1/4 of the cars visible front should be in the appropriate side
    >mirror.

    >There, I hope that’s clear enough.  Anyway, I’ve used this technique since I’ve
    >read the article and it works great.  By the time the is out of the side mirror
    >view (passing) I can turn my head slightly and see it out the window.

    >Unfortunately, In my wifes ’85 Sentra, her single side mirror does not adjust
    >for this.  

    >If anyone knows of good sources for aftermarket electric side mount mirrors, I
    >would greatly appreciate the info.

    >Thanks,

    >Steven

            My daughter bought me a WINK mirror for xmas. One of those jobs
        that goes all the way across the top of your windshield. Actually it is
        five mirror built into one mount. It takes a little getting used to,but
        once your accustomed it, it is great. You can see everything behind you
        and both sides blind spots without even using your side mirrors.>–

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    >Steven Johnson (IMD)                        M/S FM2-60
    >sjohn…@pcocd2.intel.com                   1900 Prairie City Road
    >(916)356-5540                               Folsom, CA 95630

  7. admin says:

    Two people have referred to "WINK" mirrors that cover the entire top
    of the windshield and provide blind-spot free rear views.  

    Is this device as good as it seems?  Just offhand, I can see a serious
    problem whhen driving away from the sun.  

    Are they available for all car models?  [I've an 89 Cavalier]

    How much are they?

    Where can I see one/buy one?

    Thanks.

    —————>Elisabeth Anne Riba * l…@chaos.cs.brandeis.edu<————–
    SOCKS–THINGS TO DO:  Line litter box with remaining copies of Millie’s book;
    Visit Lincoln Bedroom–leave hairball; Use everything as a scratching post;
    Bring in crystal healer to cleanse the White House of Millie vibes; Take a nap

  8. admin says:

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    In article <lis.729642…@chaos.cs.brandeis.edu> l…@chaos.cs.brandeis.edu (Elisabeth Riba) writes:
    >Two people have referred to "WINK" mirrors that cover the entire top
    >of the windshield and provide blind-spot free rear views.  

    >Is this device as good as it seems?  Just offhand, I can see a serious
    >problem whhen driving away from the sun.  

    >Are they available for all car models?  [I've an 89 Cavalier]

    >How much are they?

    >Where can I see one/buy one?

    >Thanks.
    >–
    >—————>Elisabeth Anne Riba * l…@chaos.cs.brandeis.edu<————–
    >SOCKS–THINGS TO DO:  Line litter box with remaining copies of Millie’s book;
    >Visit Lincoln Bedroom–leave hairball; Use everything as a scratching post;
    >Bring in crystal healer to cleanse the White House of Millie vibes; Take a nap

            Most parts stores carry them. K-Mart and Wal Mart,I think. They
        cost about $16.00. I haven’t noticed the sun being anymore of a problem
        than usual. They are not day/ night type, but are tinted a little.