Driving automobiles

Laser Jamming

After seeing articles on laser speed detection, and radar jamming, I was
wondering if it would be possible to jam the new laser guns legally by
simply creating a steady emission of light of the proper wavelength from
the car.  I havent heard of any laws prohibiting this (as opposed to
RF jamming).  I believe the lasers operate in the infrared spectrum, so
I dont know what could be used to produce the light.  It would have to
be at a fairly wide angle.  Any thoughts?

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posted by admin in Uncategorized and have Comments (5)

5 Responses to “Laser Jamming”

  1. admin says:

    nelso…@sage.cc.purdue.edu (grey space alien) writes:

    > After seeing articles on laser speed detection, and radar jamming, I was
    > wondering if it would be possible to jam the new laser guns legally by
    > simply creating a steady emission of light of the proper wavelength from
    > the car.  I havent heard of any laws prohibiting this (as opposed to
    > RF jamming).  I believe the lasers operate in the infrared spectrum, so
    > I dont know what could be used to produce the light.  It would have to
    > be at a fairly wide angle.  Any thoughts?

    Sure, seems like if you had a set of driving/fog lights with the right
    filters, you could "blind" the laser emmiter.

    You could then alos be like Speed Racer, and have an I/R helmet, so you can
    drive with your normal lights off.. :)

    So the cops cant see you at night.. :)

         Dan Reed – b…@cellar.org – AutoCAD Geek -Industrial Music Lover
          68′Cougar, 89′VW Golf, 74′Honda Cb360, 89′Rollerblade Zetras’
      "Anyone can get a gun Otis. You can make a phone call and get a gun."

  2. admin says:

    The laser radar most likely transmits a spread-spectrum type signal
    called pseudo-random-noise.  This is a wide band digital stream of zeros
    and ones that unless you know the  code they’re transmitting, you  won’t
    be able  to jam  it.  The only way I can see of upsetting  the laser unit
    is to  blind its’ reciever unit with a very powerful continuous beam and
    simply desensitise it to the point that it stops seeing its reflection
    because of reciever overload.  The problem with that is, that you might
    hurt someone (of cut something) with your transmissions. good fun!

    Steve – ZL1BHD

  3. admin says:

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    In article <8NoPyB3w1…@cellar.org> b…@cellar.org (Dan Reed) writes:
    >nelso…@sage.cc.purdue.edu (grey space alien) writes:

    >> After seeing articles on laser speed detection, and radar jamming, I was
    >> wondering if it would be possible to jam the new laser guns legally by
    >> simply creating a steady emission of light of the proper wavelength from
    >> the car.  I havent heard of any laws prohibiting this (as opposed to
    >> RF jamming).  I believe the lasers operate in the infrared spectrum, so
    >> I dont know what could be used to produce the light.  It would have to
    >> be at a fairly wide angle.  Any thoughts?

    >Sure, seems like if you had a set of driving/fog lights with the right
    >filters, you could "blind" the laser emmiter.

    >You could then alos be like Speed Racer, and have an I/R helmet, so you can
    >drive with your normal lights off.. :)

    >So the cops cant see you at night.. :)

            This is more than a little bit illegal and may carry similar or
    greater penalties than reckless driving.  Depending on the state, this may
    be more than a "summary offense" and may show up on a criminal record.

            All in all, it’s not a good idea to drive without visible headlights
    at night, if only for the reason that other drivers don’t have a prayer of
    seeing where you are.

    Later,

    Chris BeHanna   DoD# 114          1983 H-D FXWG Wide Glide – Jubilee’s Red Lady
    beha…@syl.nj.nec.com              1975 CB360T – Baby Bike
    Disclaimer:  Now why would NEC
    agree with any of this anyway?    I was raised by a pack of wild corn dogs.

  4. admin says:

    beha…@phoenix.syl.nj.nec.com  writes:
    > >drive with your normal lights off.. :)

    > >So the cops cant see you at night.. :)

    >    This is more than a little bit illegal and may carry similar or
    > greater penalties than reckless driving.  Depending on the state, this may
    > be more than a "summary offense" and may show up on a criminal record.

    >    All in all, it’s not a good idea to drive without visible headlights
    > at night, if only for the reason that other drivers don’t have a prayer of
    > seeing where you are.

    See the little smilie face?  Okay turn your head sideways.  Now do you see it?
    This means that he is joking.  Ha, ha.  Laugh.  A funny.  Get it?  He’s
    not actually suggesting that everyone go out and drive around with their
    lights off!  Lighten up!  Geeze!


    Mike Golden – mgol…@cwis.unomaha.edu
    "Don’t get me wrong.. I like cats…. Taste sorta like chicken!"
    "Keep honking… I’m reloading."

  5. admin says:

    Steve_Wri…@kcbbs.gen.nz (Steve Wright) writes:
    >The laser radar most likely transmits a spread-spectrum type signal
    >called pseudo-random-noise.  This is a wide band digital stream of zeros
    >and ones that unless you know the  code they’re transmitting, you  won’t
    >be able  to jam  it.  The only way I can see of upsetting  the laser unit
    >is to  blind its’ reciever unit with a very powerful continuous beam and
    >simply desensitise it to the point that it stops seeing its reflection
    >because of reciever overload.

    They’re pretty narrow-spectrum.  It’s actually quite hard to make a
    spread-spectrum laser; most spread-spectrum lasers are chemical rather
    than solid-state (which makes them a *lot* more expensive to build and
    operate) and tend to operate in the higher-energy bands
    (middle-visible through UV).  Marked transmissions work fine if you’re
    fighting random noise which has an average signal strength at or below
    the signal you’re trying to receive.  If the noise is stronger you get
    the "desensitization" you’re talking about.  In any case I don’t
    believe the laser guns are putting out marked signals.  Why should
    they?  It’s expensive to put in advanced filtering equipment to fight
    an almost nonexistant threat, and if the gun fails to register once in
    awhile, who cares?

    >The problem with that is, that you might
    >hurt someone (of cut something) with your transmissions.

    A defocused laser (or several, they’re cheap :-) in continuous
    operation aimed at the transmitter is going to have a stronger signal
    strength than the same laser reflecting off of some part of your
    car.(1) It’ll swamp the receiver completely — and you’re still not
    putting out enough power to hurt anyone.  Note that few lasers have
    the power output to warm something by a few degrees, much less cut
    something.  Most of them are only dangerous if you look directly into
    the beam.

    jim frost
    j…@centerline.com

    (1) I’m assuming you’ll build the jammer out of the same laser diodes
    the laser manufacturer is using, thus making this a virtual certainty.
    You might pick the next step up in power output so you can defocus it
    more and still get the desired effect, using fewer lasers.  You might
    also just buy a light that swamps the entire band and not bother with
    lasers at all — what the hell, the lasers operate in the milliwatt
    range.